What is digital agriculture?

Digital agriculture is the use of digital technology to integrate agricultural production from the paddock to the consumer. These technologies can provide the agricultural industry with tools and information to make more informed decisions and improve productivity.

Trends driving digital technology in agriculture

Victoria’s farmers contribute one third of Australia’s food and fibre exports. Demand for Victorian-produced food is set to grow as the world’s population increases from seven billion to almost 10 billion over the next 30 years.

A growing global middle class, particularly among our neighbours in Asia, is further bolstering the prospects for food and fibre export growth.

While demand is set to grow, farmers are facing the challenges of a changing climate:

  • increased temperatures
  • changes in rainfall patterns
  • more frequent extreme weather events
  • reductions in water availability.

In this environment, farmers must continue to innovate to maintain and improve productivity to meet demand.

Digital technologies have the potential to provide farmers with the information and ability to meet these challenges and seize opportunities for growth.

But it is not just about farmers. Consumers both at home and abroad are becoming more informed about the products they buy. They demand high quality and sustainably produced food and fibre and want to know more about where their products come from.

Digital technologies can enable improved traceability of agricultural products, providing peace of mind for consumers and increased value for farmers.

[Voice over]

The Victorian Government is working to ensure that our farmers are at the forefront of agriculture’s digital revolution.

We are doing this by supporting and leading research in agriculture technologies, helping to reduce barriers to widespread technology adoption on-farm, and building digital capability in Victoria’s agriculture sector.

Digital agriculture refers to the use of agriculture technology, or AgTech, to integrate agricultural production from the paddock to the consumer.

These technologies can provide the agricultural industry with the tools and information to make more informed decisions and improve productivity.

Digital technologies also have the potential to provide farmers with the information and ability to meet challenges, such as a changing climate, and seize opportunities for growth.

[Minister for Agriculture]

Agriculture Victoria’s digital agriculture strategy is about exciting new frontiers for our $14 billion agricultural sector. Agriculture’s the least digitised sector in the Victorian economy and there’s just so much potential to use new technology to make our farms more productive, more profitable and more sustainable in the future.

[Voice over]

The centrepiece is a $27 million commitment to support Victorian farmers to adopt digital technologies, including the $12 million On-farm Internet of Things Trial.

As Australia's premier agriculture state and home of innovation, Victoria is well placed to lead agriculture’s digital revolution.

To find out more, visit agriculture.vic.gov.au/digitalag

Authorised by Agriculture Victoria, 1 Spring Street Melbourne.

Spoken by Tyson Witham.

Victoria's Digital Agriculture Strategy was released on 11 October 2018 and outlines the Victorian Government’s plan to support Victorian farmers to seize the opportunities of digital technologies.

Examples

Opportunities to lift productivity in the agricultural sector lie in new and emerging technologies such as robotics, new packaging material, biotechnology and digital and wireless technologies for data measurement, weather monitoring, animal monitoring, geospatial monitoring, and precision application of water and chemicals.

Robotics

Robotics are being introduced to the dairy, poultry and beef farming industries. Applications include:

  • autonomous feeding and milking
  • egg collection and sorting
  • autonomous cleaning.

These technologies are helping early detection and treatment of animal health issues.

Satellite imagery

In cropping, less waste and higher yields are being generated by equipment programmed for variable seeding rates and depths based on soil property and moisture data, derived from satellite imagery.

Digital infra-red light and heat sensors combined with geographic information system technology in drones are used measure paddock crop health to inform decisions about:

  • irrigation
  • pest management
  • fertiliser applications
  • harvesting.

Sensors and electronic identification

Integrated digital animal health biometric sensors and electronic identification devices enable farmers to rapidly respond to cases of animal stress or disease, helping to increase livestock production and improve livestock health.

Page last updated: 21 Jul 2020