Euoniticellus pallipes (introduced)

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Light brown dung beetle front on and top down photos. Labels read: -Euoniticellus pallipes (male) -A slight curve in this ridge is the distinguishing feature for male E. pallipes -Dark patches on the pronotum are characteristic of both E. pallipes and E. africanus - Characteristic dark spots on the pronotum. E. pallipes has two distinct pairs of patches. The middle and rear patches are usually of comparable intensity - E. pallipes is easily confused with E. africanus. Examination of the ridges on the head is the most reliable way to tell them apartLight brown dung beetle photographed in profile and top down. Labels read: Euoniticellus pallipes (female) The head of the female E. pallipes has a distinctly raised ridge. In contrast, the head of E. africanus is flat in profile E. pallipes is a brown to golden coloured beetle with darker markings Characteristic dark spots on the pronotum. E. pallipes has two distinct pairs of patches. The middle and rear patches are usually of comparable intensity The hairs (setae) at the rear of the beetle are common in all Euoniticellus species and are not diagnostic

Size

9–12 mm

Colour

Light to medium brown with speckling over the pronotum and wing covers. 2-3 pairs of dark patches in the centre of the pronotum.

Horns

None. Males and females have characteristic ridges on their head that allow them to be distinguished from each other and other Euoniticellus species.

Similar species

E. pallipes is similar to other 3 species  E. fulvus, E. intermedius, and E. africanus. The markings on the pronotum and ridges on the head sets it apart.

Flight time

Day

Active seasons

Spring to autumn

Distribution in Australia

Victoria, WA, SA, NSW

Map of Australia indicating E pallipes in SW WA, SE SA, NW Vic and southern NSW

South West Prime Lamb Group (SWPLG) demonstrations

E. pallipes has been caught at Cashmore and near Hamilton in small numbers. E. fulvus was found more commonly in SWPLG traps and can be distinguished by a lack of markings on the pronotum.

Lifecycle

E. pallipes builds nests with several brood masses, each containing a single egg, which develops into an adult between five and seven weeks later.

Acknowledgements and references

Page last updated: 03 Feb 2023