Euoniticellus fulvus (introduced)

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Euniticellus fulvus (male) Front photo of a golden brown dung beetle and top down photo below. Arrows point to two distinct ridges near the front of the head on males.  And tan brown pronotum that lacks distinctive markings distinguishes E. fulvus from the other Euoniticellus species in AustraliaEuniticellus fulvus (female) Front photo of a golden brown dung beetle and top down photo below. Arrows point to the head and description says the head of E. fulvus females does not have any ridges giving it a flat appearance.  Arrow point to the back and description reads tan brown pronotum that lacks distinctive markings distinguishes E. fulvus from the other Euoniticellus species in Australia

Size

8–12 mm

Euniticellus fulvus (male) Front photo of a golden brown dung beetle and top down photo below. Arrows point to two distinct ridges near the front of the head on males.  And tan brown pronotum that lacks distinctive markings distinguishes E. fulvus from the other Euoniticellus species in Australia

Colour

Golden/ yellow to brown, without speckling on pronotum

Horns

None. Males have two ridges at front of head, but females have none.

Similar species

E. fulvus is similar to other species of Euoniticellus including E. intermedius, E. pallipes and E. africanus. However, E. fulvus is slightly smaller and the lack of markings set it apart.

Flight time

Day

Active seasons

Spring to autumn

Distribution in Australia

Victoria, WA, SA, Tas, NSW

Map of australia showing presence of E fulvus in sth NSW, Victoria, Tasmania and southern NSW

Origin

Native to western and central Europe, the Middle East and north Africa

South West Prime Lamb Group (SWPLG) demonstrations

E. fulvus has been caught at all SWPLG properties hosting traps. It is commonly found with Onthophagus taurus and Onthophagus binodis, though in smaller numbers.

Lifecycle

Nests are about 20 cm below the surface in which several brood masses are constructed, each with one egg. Adults develop in approximately 5–8 weeks.

Dung burial

E. fulvus buries dung to around 20 cm.

Preferences and establishment

The number of beetles present on a farm is largely dependent on the amount of dung available. E. fulvus can be introduced as starter colonies and is provided by some dung beetle suppliers. A list of dung beetle suppliers can be found on the DBEE link below.

Acknowledgements and references

Page last updated: 21 Nov 2022