State prohibited weeds in Victoria

State prohibited weeds are the highest category of declared noxious weeds in Victoria. State prohibited weeds either:

  • do not occur in Victoria, or
  • are present in small numbers and can reasonably be expected to be eradicated

Under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (CaLP Act), it is an offence to buy, sell, display or transport a State prohibited weed within Victoria.

The impact on Victoria

By preventing State prohibited weeds from becoming widespread, Victorians can save millions of dollars each year in lost agricultural production and control costs.

It also helps to reduce the potential harmful impact that these weeds could have on:

  • the environment
  • our social amenity
  • human health, in some cases

Our role

Agriculture Victoria is responsible for these species on all land in Victoria. We aim to:

  • prevent the introduction of State prohibited weeds into Victoria
  • detect and eradicate any infestations before they become widespread

This is to protect our environment, economy and social values.

Reporting State prohibited weeds

The community, industry, government agencies and universities are important partners in achieving eradication. By looking out for and reporting State prohibited weeds, you can help protect Victoria from these high-risk invasive plants.

Report a State prohibited weed to us:

  1. call 136 186
  2. email weed.spotters@agriculture.vic.gov.au

When making a report, include the following details to help our officers follow up as quickly as possible:

  • your name
  • your contact phone number
  • your email address
  • the name of the plant that you wish to report and a brief description
  • the number of plants that you found or spotted
  • the location where the plant was found or spotted (specific references to streets or landmarks are helpful)
  • photographs of the plant

Where might I find a State prohibited weed?

Places you may find a State prohibited weed include:

  • ponds, dams, rivers, creeks and wetlands
  • private gardens, including home gardens, restaurants and cafes
  • rare plant collections
  • public parks and gardens
  • agricultural land or farming areas
  • markets, garage sales, in the media and online
  • for sale in nurseries and garden centres
  • natural areas
  • roadsides, waste places and urban fringes
Page last updated: 02 Feb 2021